WK5 Capstone Project

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At this point in the course you should have taken the necessary steps to ensure that your Capstone Project is complete. You should make your final edits and incorporate Instructor feedback. Once you have completed those final steps you should submit your Capstone Project.
Capstone Project
HERE IS THE PROFESSOR FEEDBACK FROM WEEK 4 ASSIGNMENT THAT YOU COMPLETED. SO GO BACK TO WEEK 4 THE APLLICATION FEEDBACK ON DRAFT YOU WILL USE IT AND FOLLOW EVERYTHING IN WRITING BELOW.AND BELOW IS WHAT SHE SAID THE PAPER WILL NEED WHEN YOU PUT THE 8-10 PAGE CAPSTONE TOGETHER. IT’S VERY IMPORTANT THAT YOU FOLLOW ALL DIRECTIONS FOR THIS ASSIGNMENT
NOTE FROM PROFESSOR Week 4 Assignment
This is a great start. Reference page and in text cites look good. Be sure that you answer each of the 5 questions posed in the capstone project instructions. Questions are listed below. Also be sure to include 8-10 references to help you write the paper to get the depth that you need.
1. A brief description of your topic and an explanation of why you selected it.
2.A brief explanation of how your topic relates to your concentration in your program
3. A summary of relevant information related to your topic
4. An explanation of how you might apply the information to criminal justice work in your concentration (e.g., Homeland Security.Criminal Justice Management and Administration; Human Services for Criminal Justice, etc.)
5. explanation of how the information might be used to affect social change

Instructions
Capstone Project
The Capstone Project integrates and applies the concepts of human rights, the rule of law, or international justice with/to your area of concentration in the Criminal Justice Program. Your topic should relate to one of the three concepts: human rights, the rule of law, or international justice.
Your Capstone Project must be presented as an 8- to 10-page (not including title page or references), double-spaced, APA-formatted paper that utilizes appropriate grammar and spelling.
The Capstone Project must include:
A minimum of 8–10 references (in addition to any course readings that you may wish to reference). Please be aware that user-created websites, such as Wikipedia, will not be accepted as scholarly references. (Please consult the Walden University Library webpage: How to Evaluate Research Resources)
Now we are in Week 5, you should become familiar with the project requirements and have them in mind as you proceed through to complete the project.
The Capstone Project will be evaluated according to all four indicators in the Capstone Project and Writing Rubric located in the Course Info area.
Information on scholarly writing may be found in the APA Manual and at the Walden Writing Center website. Also see the Walden University Policies and Information, in the Guidelines and Policies area, under “Policies on Academic Honesty.”
Major international and regional human rights treaties demand an
effective remedy be available for individual victims of human rights
violations. A remedy involves two elements: a victim’s access to the
appropriate authorities to have his claim fairly heard and decided;
and the redress or relief that he can receive. Much of the work by
the International Center for Transitional Justice—and in fact much of
the field of transitional justice—can be understood as the pursuit of
effective remedies for victims of severe human rights violations. ICTJ’s
work focuses on the practical and technical aspects of such remedies.
OBLIGATIONS AFTER HUMAN RIGHTS ABUSES
Transitional justice experts generally identify four important state obligations in contexts of gross
or systematic violations of human rights: full exploration of the truth, prosecution, reparations that
respect the dignity of each beneficiary, and reforms of state laws and institutions. ICTJ uses its global
network and in depth comparative experience to advise victims, communities, and policymakers on
best practice and real life challenges when developing policies to meet these obligations.
ICTJ’s efforts to improve the strength and accessibility of remedies include:
Cambodia
The ongoing criminal trial of former Khmer Rouge leaders before the Extraordinary Chambers in
the Courts of Cambodia (ECCC) allows victims to pursue claims for reparations as civil parties. The
ECCC can award “moral and collective” reparations. Since 2006, ICTJ has given input on potential
provisions and mechanisms for such claims. ICTJ’s work has included a workshop for ECCC judges
on comparative experiences of judicial reparations, workshops with representatives of victims’
organizations, and responses to requests by the ECCC Victims Unit for information.
In November 2009 ICTJ’s Reparations Unit, submitted a paper to the ECCC entitled “Practical,
Feasible and Meaningful: How the Khmer Rouge Tribunal Can Fulfill Its Reparations Mandate.” The
paper, available also in Khmer, offered guidance for dealing with the practical and legal issues that
have arisen as the ECCC seeks to fulfill its reparations mandate, including proposals that address the
challenges of how meaningful measures can be implemented even when resources are limited and
the beneficiaries are collective, rather than individual.
Colombia
In recent years ICTJ filed three amicus curiae briefs with Colombia’s Constitutional Court in support
of victims’ rights. The first called for enhanced protections for victims as defined by the 2005 Justice
and Peace Law, with a particular emphasis on women. The second reviewed legal and substantive
differences between humanitarian assistance and reparation measures, arguing that the Colombian
government could not conflate humanitarian measures with fulfillment of state reparations’
Effective Remedies to Human
Rights Violations
F O C U S :I C T JA N DT H ER I G H TT OAR E M E D Y
continued on back
Effective Remedies to
Human Rights Violations
obligations. A third brief focused on concept of victim according to international human rights
law and the need to adapt national procedures to encompass the particular type of victimization
suffered by lesbian, gay, bisexual and transsexual persons.ICTJ intervened in order to ensure same-
sex partners of direct victims were recognized as beneficiaries of victim services and reparations
programs. The court included all three briefs in its formal record and adopted their proposed lines of
reasoning.
Morocco
In January 2004, King Mohammed VI established an Equity and Reconciliation Commission (IER) to
establish the truth about enforced disappearances and arbitrary detentions that occurred between
1956 and 1999, identify institutional responsibility for such abuses; provide reparations to victim,
recommend reforms to prevent the repetition of violations; and promote reconciliation.
The IER was the first official truth-seeking experiment in the Middle East and North Africa. ICTJ
worked with IER commissioners, many of whom were well known civil society activists, to ensure
the Commission’s work benefited from the truth-seeking experiences of other countries. The
technical information provided by ICTJ enabled Commissioners to strengthen its hearings strategy
and in particular commit to holding ground-breaking public hearings. ICTJ advice also assisted IER
commissioners to define and develop a feasible and innovative reparations policy that was gender
sensitive and included both communal and individual reparations mechanisms.
ICTJ has worked with local civil society partners to strengthen monitoring and follow up by
government and civil society of the IER’s recommendations, and to assist activists and stakeholders
in the Middle East and North Africa region benefit from the skills and expertise of their Moroccan
colleagues.
South Africa
In coalition with local NGOs, ICTJ in 2009 played an instrumental role in overturning a national
prosecution policy which provided effective impunity for apartheid era perpetrators. Victims
complained that the prosecution policy provided for a closed-door rerun of the TRC’s amnesty
process under the guise of prosecutorial discretion. ICTJ helped prepare a constitutional law
challenge to this policy which was struck down by the High Court in December 2008. ICTJ was a
public interest applicant in the court case.

Prosecutors may no longer resort to amnesty-type criteria for purposes of declining to prosecute. ICTJ
is now pushing for the prosecution of key cases from the past. Prosecutors have agreed to pursue
these cases which include enforced disappearances, murder and torture. The outcome has important
implications for the rights of victims to justice and the role of the state in public prosecutions.
ICTJ also played a central role in challenging the Special Dispensation on Political Pardons. This
special dispensation provided for a secret procedure for processing pardon applications from
perpetrators who claimed to have committed offences for a political purpose. Politicians who worked
behind closed doors presided over the process, excluding victims and other interested parties. ICTJ
prepared the urgent court application. The High Court issued an interim court order restraining the
President from granting any pardons under the Special Dispensation for Political Pardons pending
the outcome of the legal proceedings. The perpetrators who applied for political pardons retain their
convictions and sanctions pending the outcome of this case. This matter has been taken on appeal to
the Constitutional Court.The outcome has important implications for victims’ rights in pardons and
amnesty processes.
December 2009
The International Center for Transitional Justice works to redress and prevent the most severe violations of
human rights by confronting legacies of mass abuse. ICTJ seeks holistic solutions to promote accountability and
create just and peaceful societies. To learn more, visit www.ictj.org
Major international and regional human rights treaties demand an
effective remedy be available for individual victims of human rights
violations. A remedy involves two elements: a victim’s access to the
appropriate authorities to have his claim fairly heard and decided;
and the redress or relief that he can receive. Much of the work by
the International Center for Transitional Justice—and in fact much of
the field of transitional justice—can be understood as the pursuit of
effective remedies for victims of severe human rights violations. ICTJ’s
work focuses on the practical and technical aspects of such remedies.
OBLIGATIONS AFTER HUMAN RIGHTS ABUSES
Transitional justice experts generally identify four important state obligations in contexts of gross
or systematic violations of human rights: full exploration of the truth, prosecution, reparations that
respect the dignity of each beneficiary, and reforms of state laws and institutions. ICTJ uses its global
network and in depth comparative experience to advise victims, communities, and policymakers on
best practice and real life challenges when developing policies to meet these obligations.
ICTJ’s efforts to improve the strength and accessibility of remedies include:
Cambodia
The ongoing criminal trial of former Khmer Rouge leaders before the Extraordinary Chambers in
the Courts of Cambodia (ECCC) allows victims to pursue claims for reparations as civil parties. The
ECCC can award “moral and collective” reparations. Since 2006, ICTJ has given input on potential
provisions and mechanisms for such claims. ICTJ’s work has included a workshop for ECCC judges
on comparative experiences of judicial reparations, workshops with representatives of victims’
organizations, and responses to requests by the ECCC Victims Unit for information.
In November 2009 ICTJ’s Reparations Unit, submitted a paper to the ECCC entitled “Practical,
Feasible and Meaningful: How the Khmer Rouge Tribunal Can Fulfill Its Reparations Mandate.” The
paper, available also in Khmer, offered guidance for dealing with the practical and legal issues that
have arisen as the ECCC seeks to fulfill its reparations mandate, including proposals that address the
challenges of how meaningful measures can be implemented even when resources are limited and
the beneficiaries are collective, rather than individual.
Colombia
In recent years ICTJ filed three amicus curiae briefs with Colombia’s Constitutional Court in support
of victims’ rights. The first called for enhanced protections for victims as defined by the 2005 Justice
and Peace Law, with a particular emphasis on women. The second reviewed legal and substantive
differences between humanitarian assistance and reparation measures, arguing that the Colombian
government could not conflate humanitarian measures with fulfillment of state reparations’
Effective Remedies to Human
Rights Violations
F O C U S :I C T JA N DT H ER I G H TT OAR E M E D Y
continued on back
Effective Remedies to
Human Rights Violations
obligations. A third brief focused on concept of victim according to international human rights
law and the need to adapt national procedures to encompass the particular type of victimization
suffered by lesbian, gay, bisexual and transsexual persons.ICTJ intervened in order to ensure same-
sex partners of direct victims were recognized as beneficiaries of victim services and reparations
programs. The court included all three briefs in its formal record and adopted their proposed lines of
reasoning.
Morocco
In January 2004, King Mohammed VI established an Equity and Reconciliation Commission (IER) to
establish the truth about enforced disappearances and arbitrary detentions that occurred between
1956 and 1999, identify institutional responsibility for such abuses; provide reparations to victim,
recommend reforms to prevent the repetition of violations; and promote reconciliation.
The IER was the first official truth-seeking experiment in the Middle East and North Africa. ICTJ
worked with IER commissioners, many of whom were well known civil society activists, to ensure
the Commission’s work benefited from the truth-seeking experiences of other countries. The
technical information provided by ICTJ enabled Commissioners to strengthen its hearings strategy
and in particular commit to holding ground-breaking public hearings. ICTJ advice also assisted IER
commissioners to define and develop a feasible and innovative reparations policy that was gender
sensitive and included both communal and individual reparations mechanisms.
ICTJ has worked with local civil society partners to strengthen monitoring and follow up by
government and civil society of the IER’s recommendations, and to assist activists and stakeholders
in the Middle East and North Africa region benefit from the skills and expertise of their Moroccan
colleagues.
South Africa
In coalition with local NGOs, ICTJ in 2009 played an instrumental role in overturning a national
prosecution policy which provided effective impunity for apartheid era perpetrators. Victims
complained that the prosecution policy provided for a closed-door rerun of the TRC’s amnesty
process under the guise of prosecutorial discretion. ICTJ helped prepare a constitutional law
challenge to this policy which was struck down by the High Court in December 2008. ICTJ was a
public interest applicant in the court case.

Prosecutors may no longer resort to amnesty-type criteria for purposes of declining to prosecute. ICTJ
is now pushing for the prosecution of key cases from the past. Prosecutors have agreed to pursue
these cases which include enforced disappearances, murder and torture. The outcome has important
implications for the rights of victims to justice and the role of the state in public prosecutions.
ICTJ also played a central role in challenging the Special Dispensation on Political Pardons. This
special dispensation provided for a secret procedure for processing pardon applications from
perpetrators who claimed to have committed offences for a political purpose. Politicians who worked
behind closed doors presided over the process, excluding victims and other interested parties. ICTJ
prepared the urgent court application. The High Court issued an interim court order restraining the
President from granting any pardons under the Special Dispensation for Political Pardons pending
the outcome of the legal proceedings. The perpetrators who applied for political pardons retain their
convictions and sanctions pending the outcome of this case. This matter has been taken on appeal to
the Constitutional Court.The outcome has important implications for victims’ rights in pardons and
amnesty processes.
December 2009
The International Center for Transitional Justice works to redress and prevent the most severe violations of
human rights by confronting legacies of mass abuse. ICTJ seeks holistic solutions to promote accountability and
create just and peaceful societies. To learn more, visit www.ictj.org
4
Feedback on Draft
Student:
Institution:
Instructor:
Course Code:
Date:
Introduction
Human rights and the rule of law are facets of the same coin. The UDHR advances mindfulness and consistency with simple liberties and possibilities via public and worldwide components to work with humans in the Member States and their regions. Article 1 of UDHR states that all of us are conceived free of pride and privileges. The rule of law ensures the integrity of all public and private institutions and organizations, including the United States of America, through criminal regulations that are publicly declared, equally enforced, and that adhere to international human rights norms and standards. Global peace and security, political equality, economic and social success, and safeguarding human rights and fundamental freedoms need regulation. (United Nations. (n.d.).
Equality and nondiscrimination
International human rights laws are founded on equality and nondiscrimination. Equality establishes that all people are born free and equal. Equality shows that everyone is entitled to the same rights and must be treated with equal respect. In their country, everyone enjoys equal access to public services. This implies that rules, laws, and programs must not be discriminatory, and government agencies must not apply for discriminatory laws, regulations, and programs. (Saalari, 2018).
Human Rights protection
Within law enforcement and the court, policies, legislation, and procedures progressively address, prevent, and mitigate human rights breaches. My neighborhoods rely heavily on the police and prosecutors to keep them safe from crime and injustice. By protecting people, they prevent crime, reduce the fear of crime, and increase and safeguard all citizens’ quality of life and human rights. The police are trying to maintain law and order in the community. Human rights are protected by the Constitution and the Bill of Rights.
Human Rights violation
The human right to be free from discrimination is normally violated within and inside the United States As said in Article 2 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. All humans distinguish all rights and freedoms contained on this Declaration, such as race, color, gender, language, religion, and political opinion. You have the proper to acquire it. However, the appropriateness of article 2 will nonetheless be a fact in lots of elements of the world, and we, too, aren’t any different. Certainly, as a long way as a small quantity of Americans is affected, Article 2 can be the maximum violated human rights. After the demise of George Floyd on the fingers of the police and the sexual harassment added to mild with the aid of using the Me-too movement, its miles clean that apartheid is alive, with bad outcomes for people who take delivery of it. (Donnelly, 2013).
.
References
Donnelly, J. (2013). Universal human rights in theory and practice. In Universal Human Rights
in Theory and Practice. Cornell University Press.
Saalari, A. (2018). Equality and Nondiscrimination in Human Rights System. Journal of Legal
Research,17(35), 145-169.
United Nations. (n.d.). United Nations and the rule of law. Retrieved from
http://www.un.org/en/ruleoflaw/
3
Equality and Non-discrimination
Student:
Institution:
Instructor:
Course Code:
Date:
International human rights laws are founded on equality and nondiscrimination. Equality establishes that all people are born free and equal. Equality indicates that everyone is entitled to the same rights and should be treated with the same respect. In their country, everyone enjoys equal access to public services. This implies that rules, laws, and programs must not be discriminatory, and government agencies must not apply discriminatory laws, regulations, and programs. (Saalari, 2018).
Prohibition of discrimination is an important part of the Equal Treatment Act. We guarantee that no one will be arbitrarily deprived of their rights based on religion, color, race, gender or language. In addition to these reasons, other factors include age, nationality, marital dignity, disability, geographic location, and sexual orientation. To attain equality, people may need to be treated differently. This is because conflicts among individuals may make exercising rights difficult without assistance. If the criteria of distinction are acceptable and the objective is to establish valid reasons under the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights, special treatment does not constitute unfair discrimination.
The need to prevent discrimination, the obligation to undermine equality, and the obligation to safeguard and promote the fulfillment and enjoyment of the right to equality and non-discrimination are all part of the right to equality and non-discrimination. Equality is to ensure that all characters have equal opportunities to do more in their lives and abilities, and everyone grows into poverty due to birth defects, birth defects, or life with disabilities. The idea is that you should not have the opportunity to do so. (Carrillo Santarelli, 2018).
Discrimination is any form of discrimination against an individual or group that results in the mistreatment of the individual or group for any of the reasons for prohibition of discrimination. In addition to the reasons given in Articles 2 and 26 of the United Nations, racism violates the law of “other dignity”. The United Nations Commission on Human Rights has never tried to define this term, but has chosen to do so. The following conditions were considered for unreasonable reasons: age, nationality, marriage status, disability, national residence and sexual orientation. (United Nations. (N.d.).
The United Nations Commission on Human Rights said, “If such a method of separation is rational and appropriate and its purpose is to achieve a legitimate purpose under the Convention, not all legal remedies are discriminatory. I am aware that. In order to get “purchasable and reasonable” compensation, the Commission proceeded with the matter based on the case. For example, in a case involving Australia, the Commission found that 60 years of group forced dismissal by aviation, an internally selected local public security facility, was the legal basis under the ICCPR.
This topic is important to me because I want to consider laws, programs, and policies that do not lead to equality and discrimination that lead to separation between individuals or groups for any reason of race, gender, disability, or age. I may also want to keep equality and indiscriminate rights in mind whenever I work on a regulation, policy, or program that distinguishes you from an individual or a group.
I may also want to remember my rights when applying eligibility criteria for economic benefits that vary based on gender and age. I need to ask myself if my regulations, policies, or programs offer the same treatment, and if so, whether the differences are acceptable and objectively justified. If I work at a pace that supports or recognizes the interests of affiliates within a potentially disadvantaged community, including indigenous peoples, I should remember my rights.
References
Carrillo-Santarelli, N. (2018). Gender identity, and equality and non-discrimination of same-sex
couples.American Journal of International Law,112(3), 479-485.
Saalari, A. (2018). Equality and Non-Discrimination in Human Rights System.Journal of Legal
Research,17(35), 145-169.
United Nations. (n.d.). United Nations and the rule of law. Retrieved from
https://www.un.org/ruleoflaw/the-three-pillars/
1
References
Besson, S., & Kleber, E. (2019). Article 2: The right to non-discrimination. In The UN
convention on the rights of the child: a commentary (pp. 41-72). Oxford University Press.
Brautigam, C. A., & Friedman, S. (2018). Overcoming Victimization through Equality and Non-
Discrimination:TheContributionoftheUnitedNationsCommissionontheStatusof
Women. In International Responses to Traumatic Stress (pp. 347-365). Routledge.
Carrillo-Santarelli, N. (2018). Gender identity, and equality and non-discrimination of same-sex
couples. American Journal of International Law, 112(3), 479-485.
Donnelly, J. (2013). Universal human rights in theory and practice (3rd ed.). Ithaca, NY: Cornell
University Press http://worldjusticeproject.org/trieved https://worldjusticeproject.org/about-
us/overview/what-rule-law
Higgins, N. (2003). The right to equality and non-discrimination with regard to language. eLaw
Journal: Murdoch University Electronic Journal of Law, 10(1), 1-38.
Itasari, E. R. (2020). Equality And Non Discrimination Principles In Providing Rights With
Disabilities. Jurnal Komunikasi Hukum (JKH), 6(2), 534-541.
McCrudden, C., & Prechal, S. (2009). The concepts of equality and non-discrimination in
Europe:Apracticalapproach. EuropeanCommission,Directorate-Generalfor
Employment, Social Affairs and Equal Opportunities, Unit G, 2.
2
Saalari, A. (2018). Equality and Non-Discrimination in Human Rights System. Journal of Legal
Research, 17(35), 145-169.
United Nations. (n.d.). United Nations and the rule of law. Retrieved from
https://www.un.org/ruleoflaw/the-three-pillars/
Zaccaroni, G. (2021). Equality and Non-discrimination in the EU: The Foundations of the EU
Legal Order. Edward Elgar Publishing.
5
Capstone Outline and Annotated Bibliography
Student:
Institution:
Instructor:
Course Code:
Date:
Outline
I. Introduction
A. Description of terms
B. Understanding Human Rights And The Rule Of Law
II. Equality and non-discrimination
A. Relevance of equality and non-discrimination to human rights
B. Importance of equality and non-discrimination
III. Human Rights protection
IV. Human Rights violation
A. Factors And Consequences
B. How human rights violations might affect the global perception of the United States
Annotated Bibliography
Besson, S., & Kleber, E. (2019). Article 2: The right to non-discrimination. InThe UN
Convention on the child’s rights: a commentary(pp. 41-72). Oxford University Press.
The United international locations conference on the child’s Rights is the most enormous and extensively ratified international human rights treaty. This statement offers a comprehensive analysis of every one of the important provisions inside the convention and its Optional Protocols on youngsters and Armed war, Prostitution, and Pornography. It offers an in-depth perception of the drafting records of those systems, the scope and nature of the rights accorded to children, and the duties imposed on states for the implementation of these rights.
Brautigam, C. A., & Friedman, S. (2018). Overcoming Victimization through Equality and Non-
Discrimination: The Contribution of the United Nations Commission on the Status of Women. InInternational Responses to Traumatic Stress(pp. 347-365). Routledge.
This chapter provides an overview of the United Nations’ efforts to empower girls. It focuses on some of those studies where United international locations contribute to the comfort of struggling girls, especially girls’ violence. United international locations, over time, have highlighted many areas and problems that often cause great sorrow and struggle for women. In addition to the emotional consequences of particularly difficult situations, violence and abuse of women are one such area. They have been a problem for policy indicators targeting the government.
Carrillo-Santarelli, N. (2018). Gender identity, and equality and non-discrimination of same-sex
couples.American Journal of International Law,112(3), 479-485.
The U.S. Human Rights Court has resolved worldwide issues concerning orientation character, same-sex connections, and LGBTI common freedoms. As talked about underneath, the court inferred that it was more useful than its European partners,finding that the principle of human independence is based on human rights and is full of personal power, the free development of human dignity.
Donnelly, J. (2013). Universal human rights in theory and practice (3rd ed.). Ithaca, NY: Cornell
University Press http://worldjusticeproject.org/trieved https://worldjusticeproject.org/about-us/overview/what-rule-law
No matter who we are or where we live, the Rule of law applies to us. It is the ultimate source of justice, possibility, and peace for all — in support of development, good government, and recognition of its fundamental rights. Research suggests that regulatory law is associated with better financial growth, more peace, less inequality, improved health outcomes, and more education.
Language rights as enshrined in many domestic, local, and international provisions dealing with discrimination, freedom of speech, and the protection of the minority.
Itasari, E. R. (2020). Equality And Non-Discrimination Principles In Providing Rights With
Disabilities.Jurnal Komunikasi Hukum (JKH),6(2), 534-541.
With the growing number of racist groups against people with disabilities, humanity will be more aware of recognizing that they can be equal in rights and less focused on alternatives. Thus, there are extraordinary freedoms for individuals with handicaps. Extraordinary freedoms are not privileges however are allowed so that individuals with disabilities can stick to their character, culture, and customs
McCrudden, C., & Prechal, S. (2009). The concepts of equality and non-discrimination in
Europe: A practical approach.European Commission, Directorate-General for Employment, Social Affairs, and Equal Opportunities, Unit G,2.
In their definitions, equality and non-segregation are confounded and very petulant ideas. The subject of uniformity and segregation overall is set apart by applied and systemic vagueness.
Saalari, A. (2018). Equality and Non-Discrimination in Human Rights System.Journal of Legal
Research,17(35), 145-169.
Human dignity is a fundamental concept of human rights. Moreover, Human Equality is based on natural dignity. With the knowledge of those concepts, we hold personal and personal autonomy and a collection worthy of dedication; and reject all forms of prejudice and humiliation. Hence equality and the elimination of unfair discrimination are human rights activities. But still, there are questions. How does equality work? What is the effect of equality on society? And more importantly, how can we achieve equality? In short, the realization of real equality is needed in an anti-apartheid marketing campaign, the same problem, and to inform all residents through the provinces and compensation measures to help disadvantaged people and companies in the network.
United Nations. (n.d.). United Nations and the Rule of law. Retrieved from
https://www.un.org/ruleoflaw/the-three-pillars/
One of the extraordinary objectives of the United Nations is to save people in the future from the scourge of war, which has made endless enduring humankind, by cooperating to keep up with worldwide harmony and security and to guarantee that the military can now, unused, be bought with strange interest. Therefore, Article 1 of the UN constitution expresses that one of the primary objectives of the association is to keep up with worldwide harmony and security, as well as to agree on global debates or circumstances that could prompt breaks of the harmony, equity, and worldwide strength.
Zaccaroni, G. (2021).Equality and Non-discrimination in the EU: The Foundations of
the EU Legal Order. Edward Elgar Publishing.
The EU’s inclusion in handling balance and non-discrimination in the general set of laws. This book centers around three significant parts of balance in the EU: uniformity as a guideline, fairness as a worth, and equity as a right.

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