RESPOND

RESPOND TO 7 COMMENTS BREIFLY 1-2 PARAGRAPHS EACH. YET TITLE EACH RESPONSE WITH THE IT’S CORRESPONDING NUMBER AND TITLE. Please do not make general statements. Personalize the comments to reflect the comments of the original posts?Top of Form

·

ONE — Existential revolt deals with those who are angry. Specifically, one who is angry about life and their current condition. As an example, in this course, we discuss John Osborne’s Look Back in Anger. This text consists of the young angry man, Jimmy. This character appears to be very dissatisfied with his life. He feels as though he cannot accomplish his dreams – thus, he is very unhappy. As a result of this example, Jimmy continuously take his anger and frustration out on his wife and his friend. 

· TWO – Social Revolt

Social Revolt

TWO -Existentialism in many ways requires that individuals question. This questioning often leads to a challenging of social norms and mores.  A key figure in absurdist theater, Beckett creating in Waiting for Godot the perfect example of social revolt in modernist literature. Our characters here are unwittingly revolting yes, and they are often confronted with ludicrous situations and characters that force them in questioning the why of life. Even their desperate consideration of suicide and challenge of the Bible represents this sort of revolt. It is true that most modernist literature confronts the realities of war, certainly realist and naturalists, the changing society and ideas and values around race class and gender. The most significant social revolt to me is under one umbrella—the questioning of authority and taken for granted truths.

· THREE – Existential Revolt

Last edited: Thursday, March 22, 2018 1:25 PM EDT
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THREE -Existential revolt and social revolt are all themes that attribute to the modern era. The modern era is defined by its repel against traditional values, mainly built upon religious beliefs. Existential revolt can also be viewed as questioning existence. It is the battle of ones self, the individual, affirming a more conscious understanding of life. It is taking full control of what you believe in. Samuel Beckett’s Waiting for Godot serves as a great example of existential/social revolt. In the play, Vladimir and Estragon are isolated from the rest of the world. They do not work or have a home. It seems as if they are stranded but they choose to be where they are, knowingly waiting for Godot. They do not listen to the advise of Pozzo and Lucky. They choose to live in blinded devoted faith while the rest of the world moves around them. They stay true to tradition and avoid the societal norms around them to the point that they seem abstract and strange. They live in disillusionment.

Another example of social revolt in modern British literature is Harold Pinter’s The Homecoming. The Homecoming is significant because it conveys a major shift in gender roles. In the play, Ruth is far from the traditional house wife. In fact, the household lacks the common motherly figure. Ruth is overly sexual and decides for herself as to how she makes her money. This play conveys the dysfunctional family and the modern woman. It is a great example of social revolt in modern British literature. 

· FOUR- Revolt

FOUR –REVOLT- An example of existential revolt can be found in Samuel Beckett’s Waiting For Godot. The idea that was prominent was that people would wait on God to direct them in life but Estragon spoke differently on occasion in Godot:

Vladimir: Let’s wait and see what he says.

Estragon: Who?

Vladimir: Godot.

Estragon: Good idea.

Vladimir: Let’s wait till we know exactly how we stand.

Estragon: On the other hand it might be better to strike the iron before it freezes

(13).

Estragon pushes the existential feeling of not waiting on God to make a decision or action, instead he wants to go now because it is the person who is in charge of living life and making decisions to the existantialist.

· FIVE – Week 9

FIVE -There were three types of revolts mentioned messianic, social, and existential. The first was a quarrel with God, the next the bourgeois order characteristic of middle class, and the last the human condition. Brustein focus was more on existential revolt. Beckett’s use of powerful language and his vision on interpreting a postwar playwright was deemed more suitable because he was able to acknowledge the meaninglessness of existence assert life. Soren Kierkegard stated that individuals not a society or religion was responsible for providing meaning to life and living passionately, sincerely, and authentically. Existential revolt identifies the human condition. We are able to affirm the meaning of our life and what is to come of it and what we can achieve.

· SIX – Existential Revolt

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SIX –  Modernist dramas are commonly laced with forms of existential revolts. In response to a question of whether or not the times have change his perspectives of analysis on modern dramas, Robert Brustein replies in in his book The Theater of Revolt with no and explains that a, “Revolt in its messianic, social, and existential manifestations still seems to me a highly useful way, though not the only way, to characterize the romantic movement of modern drama.”(xi, Brustein) For the purposes of this discussion I will focus on manifestations of the existential form of revolt that appear in many modern authors work. Playwrights like Samuel Beckett and Henrik Ibsen are mentioned in Brustein’s book but focus much more heavily on Ibsen and only gives Beckett an honorable mention.

               His explanation for excluding Beckett from the list of authors in his book is that Beckett lacks a large and complete enough body of work, but despite such a small amount of work, Beckett is still regarded as one of the greatest examples of existential revolt. The obvious and best example of Beckett’s use of existential revolt would have to be his play Waiting for Godot. The plays unusual structure and manipulation of important story elements is just a fraction of the revolt Beckett was trying to develop. The inner meaning of Beckett’s play is that the human condition is utterly hopeless to try and imagine. This idea in it of itself is an existential revolt of the existing world by which Beckett displays how futile we really are as humans.

               Ibsen, much like Beckett, had a bone to pick with societal standards. He expressed this agitation for societal common practice in his works. Some examples of his works include Brand, Peer Gynt, The League of Youth, and one the most ground breaking modern plays by the name of A Doll’s House. With A Doll’s House, Ibsen questioned certain aspects of societies current existence and as Brustein tells, “His revolt in short, is so individualistic that it transcends politics.”(53, Brustein) He argues that although Ibsen liked to stir the pot in society with controversial ideas that he was never particularly focused on politics. He believes Ibsen was an advocate for full self-realization at all costs, even at the cost of society.

Work Cited

Brustein, Robert Sanford. The theatre of revolt: an approach to the modern drama. Elephant

               Paperbacks, 1991.

· SEVEN –Social Revolt

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SEVEN –Last edited: Thursday, March 8, 2018 6:33 PM ESTExistentialism undoubtedly had a significant effect on literature during World War I.  This perspective was formed out of the interplay of ideas surrounding subjective truths that questioned the individuals relationship with God.  Some nineteenth century writers accept the fact that freedom is not inevitable and one must reject the worlds establishment of laws and institutions.  

When we examine existentialism in literature, existentialism indicates a literary movement during this period when man had the freedom to decide his own fate and make the right choices in life. The fate of the individual belongs only to the person.  Existentialist literature deals with the theme of alienation; whereas, existentialists think that every individual is virtually alone and lack togetherness with others.  The idea strikes most as meaningless or absurd.  Samuel Beckett used his characters in Waiting for Godot to show humanities struggles to overcome new challenges because it shows that waiting is true anguish and one must actually pursue the meaning in their life.  Existentialism is considered to be a rather dim philosophy for depressing times.

RESPOND TO

7

COMMENTS

BREIFL

Y

1

2 PARAGRAPHS

EACH.

YET TITLE

EACH RESPONSE WITH THE

IT’S

CORRESPONDI

NG NUMBER AND TITLE

.

Please

do not make general statements. Personalize the comments to reflect the comments of

the original posts?

ONE

Existential revolt

deals with those who are angry. Specifically, one who is angry about life

and their current condition. As an example, in this course, we discuss John Osborne’s

Look

Back

in

Anger.

This text consists of the young angry man, Jimm

y. This character appears to be very dissatisfied

with his life. He feels as though he cannot accomplish his dreams

thus, he is very unhappy. As a result

of this example, Jimmy continuously take his anger and frustration out on his wife and his friend.

·

TWO

Social

Revolt

Social Revolt

TWO

Existentialism in many ways requires that individuals question. This questioning often leads to a

challenging of social norms and mores.

A key figure in absurdist theater, Beckett creating in

Waiting

for

Godot

t

he perfect example of social revolt in modernist literature. Our characters here are

unwittingly revolting yes, and they are often confronted with ludicrous situations and characters that

force them in questioning the why of life. Even t

heir desperate consideration of suicide and challenge of

the Bible represents this sort of revolt. It is true that most modernist literature confronts the realities of

war, certainly realist and naturalists, the changing society and ideas and values around

race class and

gender. The most significant social revolt to me is under one umbrella

the questioning of authority and

taken for granted truths.

·

THREE

Existential

Revolt

THREE

Existential revolt and social revolt are all themes that attribute to the modern era. The modern

era is defined by its repel against traditional values, mainly built upon reli

gious beliefs.

Existential revolt can

also be viewed as questioning existence. It is the battle of ones self, the individual, affirming a more

conscious understanding of life. It is taking full control of what you believe in. Samuel Beckett’s

Waiting

for

G

odot

serves as a great example of

existential/social revolt. In the play, Vladimir and Estragon are isolated

from the rest of the world. They do not work or have a home. It seems as if they are stranded but they

choose to be where they are, knowingly waiti

ng for Godot. They do not listen to the advise of Pozzo and

Lucky. They choose to live in blinded devoted faith while the rest of the world moves around them. They

stay true to tradition and avoid the societal norms around them to the point that they seem

abstract and

strange. They live in disillusionment.

Another example of social revolt in modern British literature is Harold Pinter’s

The

Homecoming.

The

Homecoming

is significant because it conveys a major shift in gender roles. In the play, Ruth is far from the

traditional house wife. In fact, the household lacks the common motherly figure. Ruth is overly sexual and

decides for herself as to how she makes her money.

This play conveys the dysfunctional family and the

modern woman. It is a great example of social revolt in modern British literature.

·

FOUR

Revolt

FOUR

REVOLT

An example of existential revolt can be found in Samuel Beckett’s

Waiting

For

Godot

.

The idea that was prominent was that people would wait

on God to direct them in life but Estragon spoke

differently on occasion in Godot:

Vladimir: Let’s wait and see what he says.

Estragon: Who?

Vladimir: Godot.

Estragon: Good idea.

Vladimir: Let’s wait till we know exactly how we stand.

RESPOND TO 7 COMMENTS BREIFLY 1-2 PARAGRAPHS EACH. YET TITLE

EACH RESPONSE WITH THE IT’S CORRESPONDING NUMBER AND TITLE. Please

do not make general statements. Personalize the comments to reflect the comments of

the original posts?

ONE — Existential revolt deals with those who are angry. Specifically, one who is angry about life

and their current condition. As an example, in this course, we discuss John Osborne’s Look Back in

Anger. This text consists of the young angry man, Jimmy. This character appears to be very dissatisfied

with his life. He feels as though he cannot accomplish his dreams – thus, he is very unhappy. As a result

of this example, Jimmy continuously take his anger and frustration out on his wife and his friend.

TWO

Social Revolt

Social Revolt

TWO -Existentialism in many ways requires that individuals question. This questioning often leads to a

challenging of social norms and mores. A key figure in absurdist theater, Beckett creating in Waiting

for Godot the perfect example of social revolt in modernist literature. Our characters here are

unwittingly revolting yes, and they are often confronted with ludicrous situations and characters that

force them in questioning the why of life. Even their desperate consideration of suicide and challenge of

the Bible represents this sort of revolt. It is true that most modernist literature confronts the realities of

war, certainly realist and naturalists, the changing society and ideas and values around race class and

gender. The most significant social revolt to me is under one umbrella—the questioning of authority and

taken for granted truths.

THREE

Existential Revolt

THREE -Existential revolt and social revolt are all themes that attribute to the modern era. The modern

era is defined by its repel against traditional values, mainly built upon religious beliefs. Existential revolt can

also be viewed as questioning existence. It is the battle of ones self, the individual, affirming a more

conscious understanding of life. It is taking full control of what you believe in. Samuel Beckett’s Waiting for

Godot serves as a great example of existential/social revolt. In the play, Vladimir and Estragon are isolated

from the rest of the world. They do not work or have a home. It seems as if they are stranded but they

choose to be where they are, knowingly waiting for Godot. They do not listen to the advise of Pozzo and

Lucky. They choose to live in blinded devoted faith while the rest of the world moves around them. They

stay true to tradition and avoid the societal norms around them to the point that they seem abstract and

strange. They live in disillusionment.

Another example of social revolt in modern British literature is Harold Pinter’s The Homecoming. The

Homecoming is significant because it conveys a major shift in gender roles. In the play, Ruth is far from the

traditional house wife. In fact, the household lacks the common motherly figure. Ruth is overly sexual and

decides for herself as to how she makes her money. This play conveys the dysfunctional family and the

modern woman. It is a great example of social revolt in modern British literature.

FOUR-

Revolt

FOUR –REVOLT- An example of existential revolt can be found in Samuel Beckett’s Waiting For Godot.

The idea that was prominent was that people would wait on God to direct them in life but Estragon spoke

differently on occasion in Godot:

Vladimir: Let’s wait and see what he says.

Estragon: Who?

Vladimir: Godot.

Estragon: Good idea.

Vladimir: Let’s wait till we know exactly how we stand.

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