ENG 1102 XTIE/Composition and Modern English II

ENG 1102 XTIE/Composition and Modern English II Term 5 / 2013

May 27 – July 28

For course syllabus posted prior to the beginning of the term, the instructor reserves the right to make minor changes prior to or during the term. The instructor will notify students, via e-mail or Blackboard announcement, when changes are made in the requirements and/or grading of the course.

eTROY Courses at Troy University

All eTROY courses at Troy University utilize the Blackboard Learning System. In every eTROY course, students should read all information presented in the Blackboard course site and should periodically check for updates-at least every 48 hours. Remember: This is not a “correspondence course” in which a student may work at his/her own pace. Each week there are assignments, online discussions, online activities and/or exams with due dates. Refer to the schedule at the end of the syllabus for more information.

Course Description

ENG 1102Composition and Modern English II (3)
 Text-based analyses and application of principles and tools of research in writing short research papers. A grade of C or better is required for credit. Must be taken within first 30 hours of enrollment. Prerequisite: ENG 1101 or equivalent

ENG 1101

Course Topics:

· Brief Papers:

· Writing about narrators, characters, point of view, setting

· Writing about tone, style, themes, symbols

· Longer Papers:

· Writing about memoirs and autobiography: elements that bring the narrative to life, concrete details, illustrative scenes, reflective insights, philosophy of life, new way of looking at the world

· Supporting information to include: biographical details, background, contexts, controversies

· Writing about controversial themes, subjects, issues

Specific Course Requirements

· Upon Enrollment: Read announcements, make sure email address is correct, and complete first discussion board posting

· Discussion Board: Complete all postings and respond to peer buddies’ postings

· Definition and Question assignments: Complete all assignments to the best of your ability

· Required Essays: Meet all requirements listed for each essay

· Research: Make sure all research is properly documented.

Research Component

This course involves online research that includes using online library resources.

Entrance Competencies

· Microsoft Word

· Online research using databases and online library resources

Required Textbooks

Title:                       Backpack Literature (Custom Package)

Author:                  Kennedy, X. J.

Edition:                  2012,

Publisher:               Pearson Custom

10 digit ISBN:         1-256-41264-3

13 digit ISBN:         978-1-256-41264-9

Title:                       Writer’s Reference With Exercises

Author:                  Hacker, Diana

Edition:                  7TH 11,

Publisher:               Bedford Books

10 digit ISBN:         0-312-60147-6

13 digit ISBN:         978-0-312-60147-8

The textbook provider for the eTROY of Troy University is MBS Direct. The Web site for textbook purchases is http://www.mbsdirect.net/Index.htm

Students should have their textbook by the first week of class. Not having your textbook is not an acceptable excuse for late work. Students who add this course late should refer to the “Late Registration” section for further guidance.

Supplementary Materials

***List any supplementary materials that apply for this course***

Attendance Policy

In addition to interaction via Blackboard and e-mail contact, students are required to contact the instructor via e-mail or telephone by the first day of the term for an initial briefing. Although physical class meetings are not part of this course, participation in all interactive, learning activities is required.

Submitting Assignments

Papers: Submit via Blackboard / Assignments folder

Discussion board posts: Post in the discussion board

There are five assignments listed i

-n the course schedule: Please note the due dates on them. Your responses must be typed, using 12pt. font, double-spaced, in MS-Word format. Please include your name on your papers. Failure to comply will result in point deductions. The assignments must be turned into the Assignments Section by midnight of the due date (note: Blackboard and I operate on central US time).

Make-Up Work Policy

Missing any part of this schedule may prevent completion of the course. If you foresee difficulty of any type (i.e., an illness, employment change, etc.) which may prevent completion of this course, notify the instructor as soon as possible. Failure to do so will result in failure for an assignment and/or failure of the course. (See “Attendance” Policy.) If I have not heard from you by the deadline dates for assignments, exams, or forums, no make-up work will be allowed (unless extraordinary circumstances exist, such as hospitalization). Requests for extensions must be made in advance and accompanied by appropriate written documentation. “Computer problems” is not an acceptable excuse.

Evaluation

Grading Scale 900–1000 = A 800–899 = B 700–799 = C 600–699 = D Under 599:  F

Grading Rubric First-Year Composition An A paper is extraordinary work that more than fulfills the requirements of the assignment. This essay tackles the topic in an innovative way, with a clear sense of audience and purpose, an insightful thesis, and an appropriate and effective organization. The structure is carefully planned; each section of the essay develops the thesis with logical arguments and specific, conclusive evidence which has been interpreted and clearly related to the writer’s point. The style is energetic and precise: the sentence structure is varied and the words are carefully chosen. How the writer says things is as excellent as what the writer says. There is evidence of careful editing since the essay contains few grammatical and/or mechanical errors and, if necessary, is correctly documented using MLA format. A B paper is clearly above-average and more than meets the requirements of the assignment. Like the “A” paper, it has a clear thesis and organizational strategy; and each paragraph provides unified, coherent, and developed support for its thesis and subordinate assertions. If necessary, it properly documents sources. While the essay takes some “risks,” attempts complex strategies of development, and pays attention to audience, it falls short of the “A” essay in one or more of the following ways: the thesis may not be as interesting or insightful; there may be weaknesses in organizational strategy or its execution; the support may not be uniformly conclusive and convincing; and the style may not be as energetic or the diction as thoughtful. The essay shows strong evidence of editing since there are relatively few grammatical and/or mechanical errors. A C paper is average work that solidly meets the requirements of the assignment. The essay has a thesis and organizational plan which demonstrate thought on the writer’s part, a generally clear style, and adequate documentation, if required. Paragraphs contribute unified and coherent support, but the writer may have difficulty with any of the following: the thesis may be too general; the evidence may be predictable, may not be thoroughly interpreted, or may not be clearly related to the writer’s point; the paragraphs may be uneven in development and transition. Even in the “C” essay, there should be relatively few grammatical or mechanical errors–not enough to interfere with readability; the student has done some editing, even though it may be superficial. A D paper is below average work that demonstrates a serious attempt to fulfill the assignment and shows some promise but does not fully meet the requirements of the assignment. The essay may have one or several of the following weaknesses. It may have a general or implied thesis; but the idea may be too broad, vague, or obvious. The organizational plan may be inappropriate or inconsistently carried out. Evidence may be too general, missing, not interpreted, irrelevant to the thesis, or inappropriately repetitive. Documentation may be incomplete or inaccurate. The style may be compromised by repetitive or flawed sentence patterns and/or inappropriate diction and confusing syntax. Grammatical and mechanical errors may interfere with readability and indicate a less-than-adequate attempt at editing or an unfamiliarity with some aspects of Standard Written English. F An F paper is substantially below average for the assignment. It exhibits one or several of the following. It may be off-topic. It may be an attempt to meet the requirements of the assignment, but it may have no apparent thesis or a self-contradictory one, or the essay’s point is so general or obvious as to suggest little thinking-through of the topic. It may display little or no apparent sense of organization; it may lack development; evidence may be inappropriate and/or off-topic or may consist of generalizations, faulty assumptions, or errors of fact. This essay may fail to handle borrowed material responsibly and/or to document appropriately. The style suggests serious difficulties with fluency which may be revealed in short, simple sentences and ineffective diction. Grammatical/mechanical errors may interfere with reader comprehension or indicate problems with basic literacy or a lack of understanding of Standard English usage.

COURSE SCHEDULE

DatesAssignments
Week 1:Due June 2Review course requirements and MLA GuidelinesWrite posts in Discussion boardRead required readingsReview “These Are My Thoughts / This Is My Journey” journal assignmentCome up with topic for paper #1 / post draft in discussion board
Week 2Due June 9Post in Discussion boardRead required readingsRead responses to your paper, revise, and submit through assignment folder
Week 3Due June 16Write posts in Discussion boardRead required readingsDraft paper #2 / post in discussion board / revise / post final version via assignment folder
Week 4Due June 23Write posts in Discussion boardRead required readingsDraft paper #3 / post in discussion board / revise / post final version via assignment folder
Week 5Due June 30Write posts in Discussion boardRead required readingsContinue work on “These Are My Thoughts / This Is My Journey” journal assignment
Week 6Due July 7Write posts in Discussion boardRead required readingsDraft paper #4 / post in discussion board / revise / post final version via assignment folder
Week 7Due July 14Write posts in Discussion boardRead required readingsTurn in first draft
Week 8Due July 21Finish posts in Discussion boardRead required readingsDraft paper #5 / post in discussion board / revise / post final version via assignment folder
Week 9Due July 24Turn in “These Are My Thoughts / This Is My Journey” journal assignment

Unit 1 Writing About Plots, Main Ideas, Points of View

Learning Objectives: Upon successful completion of this unit, you will be able to describe examples of plots, main ideas, and points of view in literature.

Writing Requirement:

Please write a 500 – 750 word paper that analyzes plots, main ideas, and points of view in literature, or which creatively explores a theme or core idea.

Option 1: Describe the plot, main idea, point of view in a work of literature. See the Plot, Main Idea, Point of View flowchart

Option 2: Fight the Beast! A creative alternative in which you develop a plot and work with point of view. See the Fight the Beast! Flowchart

For help in developing your paper, please refer to the flowchart section below.

Readings:

Chapters 1 and 2 in Backpack Literature

W. Somerset Maugham  The Appointment in Samarra  

A servant tries to gallop away from Death in this brief sardonic fable retold in memorable form by a popular storyteller.

**Aesop  The Fox and the Grapes

Ever wonder where the phrase “sour grapes” comes from? Find out in this classic fable.

http://www.taleswithmorals.com/aesop-fable-the-fox-and-the-grapes.htm

**Bidpai  The Camel and His Friends

With friends like these, you can guess what the camel doesn’t need.

http://www.k-state.edu/english/baker/english320/Bidpai-The_Camel_and_His_Friends.htm

William Faulkner  A Rose for Emily  

Proud, imperious Emily Grierson defied the town from the fortress of her mansion. Who could have guessed the secret that lay within?

http://xroads.virginia.edu/~drbr/wf_rose.html

Edgar Allan Poe  The Tell-Tale Heart

       The smoldering eye at last extinguished, a murderer finds that, despite all his attempts at a cover-up, his victim will be heard.

http://xroads.virginia.edu/~hyper/poe/telltale.html

Videos: Great Authors: http://beyondutopia.net/__author-videos/

FLOWCHART: Plot, Main Idea, Point of View

Select a short story from one of the ones that was assigned and use it for the basis of the following analysis. Please use MLA style.

Length: 750 words

Opening: A gripping scene or compelling idea that hooked you while reading the story (be sure to name the story and the author).

What is the theme or main idea in the story?

How do you know?

Example or Scene #1

Example or Scene #2

Describe the plot in a few sentences.

What is the point of view? How do you know?

Example 1

Example 2

After reading the story, what were some of the perplexing thoughts that might have occurred to you? What did you gain / how did you benefit from the story?

FLOWCHART: Fight the Beast!

Here is an opportunity be creative. Write a narrative that explores a different point of view and involves a rather dramatic conflict.

Length: 750 words

A few ideas:

Anaconda / Python Hunting in South Florida

Write from the point of view of someone on a python hunt

Use stream of consciousness point of view if you’d like

Be sure to open with a vivid, illustrative scene

Include several scenes

My Nightmare, My Beastly Bete Noir

Fighting the “beast within”

Nightmares

Pre-dawn fear

What is the bad situation?

Use stream of consciousness point of view if you’d like

Be sure to open with a vivid, illustrative scene

Unit 2 Writing About Characters, Settings, Tone and Style

Learning Objectives: Upon successful completion of this unit, you will be able to analyze examples of characters, settings, tone and style in literature.

Writing Requirement:

Please write a 500 – 750 word paper that analyzes characters, settings, tone and style in literature, or which creatively explores characters, settings, tone and style.

Analyze characters, settings, tone and style in a work of literature. See the characters, settings, tone and style flowchart

For help in developing your paper, please refer to the flowcharts below.

Readings:

Chapters 3 – 5 in Backpack Literature

Chapters

   Katherine Anne Porter  The Jilting of Granny Weatherall  

http://people.morrisville.edu/~whitnemr/html/The%20Jilting%20of%20Granny%20Weatherall.htm

Kate Chopin  The Storm  

Even with her husband away, Calixta feels happily, securely married. Why then should she not shelter an old admirer from the rain?

http://www.katechopin.org/the-storm.shtml

Jorge Luis Borges  The Gospel According to Mark  

A young man from Buenos Aires is trapped by a flood on an isolated ranch. To pass the time he reads the Gospel to a family with unforeseen results.

http://southerncrossreview.org/80/borges-mark.html

Ernest Hemingway  A Clean, Well-Lighted Place  

All by himself each night, the old man lingers in the bright café. What does he need more than brandy?

http://www.mrbauld.com/hemclean.html

Stephen Crane  The Open Boat  

In a lifeboat circled by sharks, tantalized by glimpses of land, a reporter scrutinizes Fate and learns about comradeship.

http://www.online-literature.com/crane/2544/

FLOWCHART: Characters, Settings, Tone and Style

Select a short story from one of the ones that was assigned and use it for the basis of the following analysis. Please use MLA style.

Length: 750 words

Opening: A gripping scene or compelling mental image from the story that hooked you while reading (be sure to name the story and the author).

Who are the main characters in the story?

How do you know, and what stands out? What do you learn from them?

Example or Scene #1

Example or Scene #2

What is the setting? What are the key details / descriptions that give you a mental image?

Key descriptions

The feeling the setting gives you

What kind of tone and style are employed? How do you know?

Example 1

Example 2

After reading the story, what were some of the perplexing thoughts that might have occurred to you? What did you gain / how did you benefit from the story?

FLOWCHART: Quirky, Weird, but I Learned a Lot! Memorable Characters in My Life

Here is an opportunity be creative. Write a narrative that explores characters from your family, community, a place you used to work, or a place you go to often.

Length: 750 words

The “characters” in my town, family, or a place I used to work

Open with an illustrative scene

Describe the character: physical description, background, his / her “history”, how I interacted with the person

The setting: where? Vivid, concrete descriptions

Tone / voice: make it lively / authentic / meaningful

Alternative Prompts:

1. Naughty Dog! (or Cat) — The adventures and exploits of a family pet who was very lovable … but very feisty! Describe scenes and episodes that you’ll never forget (even though you try).

2. Rising to the Occasion: You never know what you’re capable of until you’re challenged to do something. Describe a situation where you succeeded — and succeeded in surprising yourself! – in something you never dreamed you could do.

3. Eccentric Family Members: Loving and even wise, in their ways… describe a family member (or members) who sometimes make you cringe, but from whom you learned a great deal. What did they teach you? When? How? What made them so eccentric? Will you be one of the eccentric ones yourself someday (if you’re not already one today…!)

Unit 3 – Themes / Symbols / Symbolism

Learning Objectives: Upon successful completion of this unit, you will be able to analyze examples of themes and symbolism in literature.

Writing Requirement:

Please write a 500 – 750 word paper that analyzes themes and symbolism in literature, or which creatively explores themes and symbolism.

Option 1: Analyze themes and symbolism in a work of literature. See the themes and symbolism flowchart

Option 2: Creepy Dreams and Lucky Charms: Symbolism in My Life

A creative alternative in which you describe dreams, superstitious behaviors, and lucky charms in your life. See the Creepy Dreams and Lucky Charms: Symbolism in My Life Flowchart

For help in developing your paper, please refer to the flowcharts below.

Readings:

Chapters 6-7 in Backpack Literature

John Steinbeck  The Chrysanthemums  

Fenced-in Elisa feels emotionally starved—then her life promises to blossom with the arrival of the scissors-grinding man.

http://nbu.bg/webs/amb/american/4/steinbeck/chrysanthemums.htm

Charlotte Perkins Gilman  The Yellow Wallpaper

A doctor prescribes a “rest cure” for his wife after the birth of their child. The new mother tries to settle in to life in the isolated and mysterious country house they have rented for the summer. The cure proves worse than the disease in this Gothic classic.

http://www.gutenberg.org/files/1952/1952-h/1952-h.htm

Franz Kafka

In the Penal Colony

http://records.viu.ca/~johnstoi/kafka/inthepenalcolony.htm

FLOWCHART: Themes and Symbolism

Select a short story from one of the ones that was assigned and use it for the basis of the following analysis. Please use MLA style.

Length: 750 words

Opening: A gripping scene or compelling mental image from the story that hooked you while reading (be sure to name the story and the author).

What is going on in the story?

How do you know, and what stands out? What do you learn from them?

Example or Scene #1

Example or Scene #2

What are some of the elements that are repeated, and which start to become a symbol?

Key descriptions

Examples

Why is the symbolism important? How do you know?

Example 1

Example 2

After reading the story, what were some of the perplexing thoughts that might have occurred to you? What did you gain / how did you benefit from the story?

FLOWCHART: Creepy Dreams and Lucky Charms: Symbolism in My Life

Here is an opportunity be creative. Write a narrative that explores omen-like dreams in your life (can be nightmares) and also the things you carry (lucky charms and amulets) or the “luck” rituals you engage in.

Length: 750 words

The omen-like dreams I’ve had, and the things I do for luck

Open with an illustrative scene

Describe yourself, give a bit of background

Give examples: creepy, omen-like dreams – did they come true?

Things you do:

The $2 Bill I Always Carry

Neiko, My Lucky Cat (point him toward the window – beckon the money in)

Lucky charms and amulets

Keep the tone lively and entertaining (unless you find a different tone works better)

Unit 4 – Reading for Deeper, Philosophical Meanings

Learning Objectives: Upon successful completion of this unit, you will be able to describe how literary devices such as imagery, metaphors can yield deeper, philosophical meanings in literature.

Writing Requirement:

Please write a 500 – 750 word paper that explores how imagery, metaphors, and other devices can yield deeper, philosophical meanings in literature.

Option 1: Describe the where, how, and when deeper meanings are generated in a work of literature. See the deeper meanings generation flowchart.

Option 2: “There Is No Meaning Without Repetition” Literature Generation

A creative alternative in which you employ literary devices such as metaphor, imagery, simile, sound to develop the potential for multiple interpretations and deeper philosophical meaning(s). See the “There Is No Meaning Without Repetition” Literature Generation Flowchart.

For help in developing your paper, please refer to the flowcharts below.

Readings:

Chapters 12-15 in Backpack Literature: focus on imagery, other figures of speech (metaphor, simile, synecdoche, metonymy), and sound to determine how meanings are generated.

Joyce Carol Oates  Where Are You Going, Where Have You Been?  

Alone in the house, Connie finds herself helpless before the advances of a spellbinding imitation teenager, Arnold Friend.

http://www.usfca.edu/jco/whereareyougoing/

Eudora Welty  A Worn Path

When the man said to old Phoenix, “you must be a hundred years old, and scared of nothing,” he might have been exaggerating, but not by much.

http://www.theatlantic.com/past/docs/issues/41feb/wornpath.htm

Sharon Olds I Could Not Tell

http://www.poetryfoundation.org/poem/176439

T. S. Eliot  The winter evening settles down  

http://www.recmusic.org/lieder/get_text.html?TextId=50140

Jean Toomer  Reapers  

http://www.poetryfoundation.org/poem/175684

Option 1:

FLOWCHART: Deeper Meanings through Imagery, Figures of Speech, Sound

Select a short story or poem from one of the ones that was assigned and use it for the basis of the following analysis. Please use MLA style.

Length: 750 words

Opening: A gripping scene or compelling mental image that captures some of the images and/or the deeper meanings. Mention the elements or devices that are repeated

How is imagery used?

Example or Scene #1

Example or Scene #2

What are literary devices being used? Find and list metaphors (synecdoche, metonymy), similes, and others

Examples

Is there any special use of sound? (assonance, alliteration)

Example 1

Example 2

After analyzing the work, which devices and concepts are repeated most often? What are some of the deeper meanings that the reader may develop?

Option 2:

FLOWCHART “There Is No Meaning Without Repetition” Literature Generation

Select a story or event from the news that intrigues you and write a fictionalized piece about it. In it, develop deeper meanings and/or literary elements by using literary devices that could include the following:

Metaphors

Imagery

Similes

Repetition of tropes, which could include characters’ gestures, characters’ behaviors, settings, etc.

Unit 5 Expanding, Revising, Shaping

Learning Objectives: Upon successful completion of this unit, you will create an expanded version of an earlier paper which both tightens and expands your previous work.

Writing Requirement:

Select one of the papers you have written for this course and expand it so that it has a total of 1,000 words.

Please be sure to do the following:

Tighten your thesis statement

Open with an engaging introductory paragraph

Provide additional examples

Correct MLA citation errors

Expand the argument and add more insights

Expand your conclusion

Student Expectation Statement

As an online learner with Troy University you are expected to:

Meet all appropriate deadlines – from the application process to the course assignment deadlines to preparing for graduation there are deadlines every step of the way that have been established to make the process easier for students to achieve their goals. It is the student’s responsibility to meet all appropriate deadlines. Routinely review the eTROY Academic Calendar and adhere to the deadlines. Start with completing your official application documents within the first term to meeting graduation intent deadlines.

Use your Troy email – the Troy University email is your official notification for all that goes on with your online program and events and notices related to the University.

Be sure to read your email and keep all correspondence with Troy staff and faculty for future reference.

Go through the orientation – the orientation for both undergraduate and graduate online learners has been designed to assist students to have a successful educational experience with their online programs. Information on how to access Blackboard and other learning tools are included in the orientation along with valuable resources on how to learn in the online environment.

Make sure that your computer meets the technical requirements and that you have adequate Internet connection. Students must have access to a working computer that they have administrator rights on and access to the Internet. Students can use University computer labs, a public library, etc. to access the Internet but some courses may require the ability to download course related software.

Make sure you are ready for online learning – eTROY works on nine week terms. Does your learning style match an accelerate course pace? Do you have the time to dedicate to an interactive course? eTROY courses are not self-paced courses, you must meet all the timelines established by the instructor and participate in all activities assigned. Read your academic catalog – your academic catalog is your “bible” for your online degree program. Please familiarize yourself with your degree program. The undergraduate and graduate catalogs can be found online at http://www.troy.edu/catalogs/. Pay close attention to admission requirements and prerequisite courses. Know the requirements for your degree plan. If you have questions your academic counselor will assist you.

Access your degree program – a link is available for students to view all degree requirements, prerequisites, major requirements and minors, if applicable.

Be sure to read and follow your syllabus.

Be sure to register during the registration timeframes – There are four weeks of registration for each term. Register early and order your books. eTROY runs on nine week terms. Waiting until the first week of classes to register and order books is too late. It is the online learners’ responsibility to be prepared for the first day of the term. eTROY students are required to order their textbooks through MBS Direct to insure the student has the proper materials for the course. The link to order textbooks from MBS is http://www.mbsdirect.net/Index.htm. eTROY is not responsible for issues regarding textbooks that have not been ordered through MBS Direct.

Work with your instructor – while in an online course the online learners are expected to work with the faculty who teach the course when questions arise related to the course and the grades. The staff cannot “fix a grade”. Once the course is completed for a grade and there are still issues, there are appropriate procedures that online learners must follow to address their concerns.

Be courteous, polite and respectful – to faculty, staff and fellow students. Inappropriate behaviors and comments will not be tolerated.

Be ethical in your coursework – Cheating, plagiarism, and other such behaviors will not be tolerated at Troy University. Specific penalties will be determined by the faculty and the consequences will adhere to Troy University policy.

Notify the University re: American with Disability Act – Eligible students, with appropriate documentation, will be provided equal opportunity to demonstrate their academic skills and potential through the provision of academic adaptations and reasonable accommodations. Further information can be found at: http://www.troy.edu/etroy/studentservices/adaptiveneeds.htm

eTROY Policies and Procedures Revised January 2012

eTROY COURSES AT TROY UNIVERSITY

All eTROY courses at Troy University utilize Blackboard Learning System. In every eTROY course, students should read all information presented in the Blackboard course site and should periodically check for updates—at least every 48 hours.

TROY E-MAIL

All students were required to obtain and use the TROY e-mail address that is automatically assigned to them as TROY students. All official correspondence (including bills, statements, e-mails from instructors and grades, etc.) will be sent ONLY to the troy.edu (@troy.edu) address.

• All students are responsible for ensuring that the correct e-mail address is listed in Blackboard by the beginning of Week #1. E-mail is the only way the instructor can, at least initially, communicate with you. It is your responsibility to make sure a valid e-mail address is provided. Failure on your part to do so can result in your missing important information that could affect your grade.

Your troy.edu e-mail address is the same as your Web Express user ID following by @troy.edu. Students are responsible for the information that is sent to their TROY e-mail account. You can get to your e-mail account by logging onto the course and clicking “E-mail Login”. You will be able to forward your TROY e-mail to your GoArmyEd e-mail account if applicable. You must first access your TROY e-mail account through the TROY e-mail link found on the Web site. After you log in to your TROY e-mail account, click on “options” on the left hand side of the page. Then click on “forwarding.” This will enable you to set up the e-mail address to which you will forward your e-mail.

STUDENT/FACULTY INTERACTION

Interaction will take place via e-mail, telephone, discussion board forums, comments on written assignments and office visits (if needed and possible).

• The student will participate in this course by following the guidelines of this syllabus and any additional information provided by the instructor, the eTROY center at Troy University, or Troy University itself.

• The student is expected to remain in regular contact with the instructor and class via e-mail or other communications means, by participating in the discussion forums, submitting assignments and taking exams, all in a timely fashion.

• TROY requires instructors to respond to students’ e-mail within 24 hours Mon-Thur, and 48 hours Fri-Sun.

TECHNOLOGY REQUIREMENTS

Students must have:

• A reliable working computer that runs Windows XP or Windows Vista.

• A TROY e-mail account that you can access on a regular basis (see “TROY e-mail” above)

• E-mail software capable of sending and receiving attached files.

• Access to the Internet with a 56.6 kb modem or better. (High speed connection such as cable or DSL preferred)

• A personal computer capable of running Netscape Navigator 7.0 or above, Internet Explorer 6.0 or above or current versions of Firefox or Mozilla. Students who use older browser versions will have compatibility problems with Blackboard.

• Microsoft WORD software. (I cannot grade anything I cannot open! This means NO MS-Works, NO WordPad, NO WordPerfect)

• Virus protection software, installed and active, to prevent the spread of viruses via the Internet and e-mail. It should be continually updated! Virus protection is provided to all Troy students free of charge. Click on the following link https://it.troy.edu/downloads/virussoftware.htm and then supply your e-mail username and password to download the virus software.

TECHINICAL SUPPORT CENTER

If you experience technical problems, you should contact the Blackboard Online Support Center. If you can log onto the course simply look at the top of the page. You will see an icon entitled, “Need Help?” If you click on this icon, you will see the information below.

For assistance with Blackboard, Wimba, Remote Proctor, and other online tools, please go to http://helpdesk.troy.edu and submit a ticket. The Educational Technology team is available 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. seven days a week to support your technical needs. For instructions on submitting a ticket, please click here.

NON-HARASSMENT, HOSTILE WORK/CLASS ENVIRONMENT

Troy University expects students to treat fellow students, their instructors, other TROY faculty, and staff as adults and with respect. No form of “hostile environment” or “harassment” will be tolerated by any student or employee.

ADAPTIVE NEEDS (ADA)

Troy University recognizes the importance of equal access for all students. In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, the University and its Adaptive Needs Program seeks to ensure that admission, academic programs, support services, student activities, and campus facilities are accessible to and usable by students who document a qualifying disability with the University.

Reasonable accommodations are available to students who:

• are otherwise qualified for admission to the University

• identify themselves to appropriate University personnel

• provide acceptable and qualifying documentation to the University.

Each student must provide recent documentation of his or her disability in order to participate in the Adaptive Needs Program. Please visit the Adaptive Needs Website @ http://www.troy.edu/ecampus/studentservices/adaptiveneeds.htm to complete the necessary procedure and forms. This should be accomplished before the beginning of class.

HONESTY AND PLAGIARISM

The awarding of a university degree attests that an individual has demonstrated mastery of a significant body of knowledge and skills of substantive value to society. Any type of dishonesty in securing those credentials therefore invites serious sanctions, up to and including suspension and expulsion (see Standard of Conduct in each TROY Catalog). Examples of dishonesty include actual or attempted cheating, plagiarism*, or knowingly furnishing false information to any university employee.

*Plagiarism is defined as submitting anything for credit in one course that has already been submitted for credit in another course, or copying any part of someone else’s intellectual work – their ideas and/or words – published or unpublished, including that of other students, and portraying it as one’s own. Proper quoting, using strict APA formatting, is required, as described by the instructor. All students are required to read the material presented at: http://troy.troy.edu/writingcenter/research.html

• Students must properly cite any quoted material. No term paper, business plan, term project, case analysis, or assignment may have no more than 20% of its content quoted from another source. Students who need assistance in learning to paraphrase should ask the instructor for guidance and consult the links at the Troy Writing Center.

• This university employs plagiarism-detection software, through which all written student assignments are processed for comparison with material published in traditional sources (books, journals, magazines), on the internet (to include essays for sale), and papers turned in by students in the same and other classes in this and all previous terms. The penalty for plagiarism may range from zero credit on the assignment, to zero in the course, to expulsion from the university with appropriate notation in the student’s permanent file.

LIBRARY SUPPORT

The Libraries of Troy University provide access to materials and services that support the academic programs. The Libraries link on the Troy University home page http://trojan.troy.edu/ can be used to access our online presence. This site provides access to the Library’s Catalog and Databases, as well as to links to all Campus libraries and to online or telephone assistance provided by Troy Library staff.

FACULTY EVALUATION

In the eighth week of each term, students will be notified of the requirement to fill out a course evaluation form. These evaluations are completely anonymous and are on-line. Further information will be posted in the Announcements section in Blackboard.

HOW TO LEARN ONLINE

Troy University eTROY is designed to serve any student, anywhere in the world, who has access to the Internet. All eTROY courses are delivered through the Learning System. Blackboard helps to better simulate the traditional classroom experience with features such as Virtual Chat, Discussion Boards, and other presentation and organizational forums.

In order to be successful, you should be organized and well motivated. You should make sure you log in to our course on Blackboard several times each week. Check all “announcements” that have been posted. Start early in the week to complete the weekly assignment. You should also go to the Discussion Board early in the week and view the topic and question/s for the group discussion exercise. Make your “initial” posting and participate in the discussion. Begin reviewing for the exams early in the term. Do not wait until the last minute and “cram” for these exams. You should review the material frequently, so you will be prepared to take the exams.

eTROY CONTACT

Whether you’re experienced at taking online courses or new to distance learning, we’re here to help you succeed in your online education. If you have general questions about eTROY programs, courses, policies, services or other university-wide topics, please visit the eTROY web site @ http://www.troy.edu/etroy; call 1-800-414-5756, or ASK TROY.

ENG 1102

Dr. Susan Nash Page 5

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